PERSPECTIVES

PERSPECTIVES/ LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
The Long War Is Almost Over
By PAUL SCHINDLER
This past Monday, I had the opportunity to attend a press screening of "Going Upriver: The Long War of John Kerry," George Butler's new documentary, due to open October 1, about the Democratic presidential nominee's time in Vietnam and his anti-war activities that followed. Butler has been friends with Kerry for nearly 40 years, and the movie is in good measure hagiography, but it nonetheless paints a vivid portrait of a young man almost painfully attached to his ideals. It may never be known how caution and ambition so thoroughly remade a young man's courage, and time is short for candidate Kerry to resummon that earlier spirit.

PERSPECTIVE/ SNIDE LINES
Day of The Living Iraqis
By SUSIE DAY
On September 8, the number of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq topped 1,00 That same day, several residents of the Washington, D.C. area inexplicably reported seeing what they described as recently killed Iraqis, walking around the nation's capital, window shopping, lined up at the Department of Motor Vehicles and registering to vote. In the Dupont Circle area, a young man, appearing to be of Middle Eastern decent, approached Troy Burns, a 39-year-old Washingtonian. "I write for 'Six Feet Under,' so I immediately guessed what was up."

PERSPECTIVES/ LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
It's your turn and this week readers write in to comment on Mayor Michael Bloomberg's opposition to a anti-bullying law in the New York public schools and to wonder when it will no longer seem "notable" that transgendered Americans are protected in civil rights legislation.


NEWS BRIEFS

By ANDY HUMM

Dem. Leader Raps Social Security Over Gay Job Protections

Marriage Likely Headed to Jersey High Court

Manitoba, Nova Scotia Move on Marriage

Spain Takes Up Same-Sex Marriage; Britain Delays

John Hammond, Gay Journalist, Activist, Dies at 67

Don't Ask, Don't Tell Don't Wor

Angels in Hollywood

Israeli Legislator Marries Same-Sex Partner

Consequences of Anglican Division

Jimmy Swaggart Will Kill Man Who Looks at Him Funny

Gay House Candidates: One Loses, One Drops Out

Anti-Gay Policies Challenged in Oklahoma and Michigan

Gays Out on TV

Volume Three, Issue 39, September 23 - 30, 2004


Photo by: Getty Images

Groping for Cover
Vincent Gentile denies same-sex harassment charges; attorney tells of gay affair

By PAUL SCHINDLER

One day after it was first reported publicly that a male aide to Brooklyn City Councilman Vincent Gentile has filed a complaint alleging sexual harassment in the workplace, a prominent gay civil rights attorney has come forward to say that he and Gentile engaged in a consensual sexual relationship in 1994. Gentile has denied having ever engaged in gay sex. (go to story)


Forced Hill Outings Continue
By ANDY HUMM
Rep. David Dreier, a veteran Republican lawmaker from California who has consistently voted against gay rights measures in the House of Representatives, has been outed as a gay man by BlogActive.com, the Web site run by Washington, D.C. activist Mike Rogers.

Homosexual Panic Defense in Brooklyn
By DUNCAN OSBORNE
The defense in the Victor Dombrova murder trial may argue that Mickey Cass, Dombrova's alleged killer, was sexually molested as a child so that when Dombrova made a sexual advance toward him, Cass was thrown into an "extreme emotional disturbance" and strangled Dombrova.

RNC Protesters Allege Police Witch Hunt
By LINCOLN ANDERSON
Before and during the Republican National Convention, the major media stoked fears of anarchists descending on New York bent on wreaking havoc. "Anarchists Hot for Mayhem" was the headline on a Daily News article reporting that "50 of the country's leading anarchists" each accompanied by "50 followers" would be in town."Finest Prep for Anarchy," blared the headline on a New York Post article that included descriptions of three "high-profile, radical" activists. AC's "Nightline" showed photos of two dozen individuals.

Lesbians Charged in Toddlers's Death
By MICK MEENAN
New York City police made a gruesome discovery early Sunday morning upon entering an apartment in a Harlem housing project. The mangled body of a baby boy, Yovany Tellez, Jr., nearly two-years-old, lay on the floor, bruises marking his face and tiny torso. A medical examiner would later determine that brunt force trauma, inflicted by the lesbian lover of his mother, had fractured three of the baby's ribs, as well as his leg, and that the child had suffered from a torn liver and a bleeding rectum.

Planning the Next Anti-Crystal Move
By DUNCAN OSBORNE
Nearly one year since they produced the first in a series of town meetings on gay men, HIV and drugs, Dan Carlson and Bruce Kellerhouse sat down with Gay City News to talk about their work, its impact and what their future efforts may be. The two men believe that their work has raised awareness about crystal meth and HIV in New York City and across the nation. But the also expressed frustration.

Optimism Despite Louisiana Loss
By DUNCAN OSBORNE
As voters in Louisiana gave overwhelming approval to an amendment to that state's constitution that bans same sex marriage, queer community leaders said that two of 11 similar bans expected on November 2 ballots may be defeated. "Oregon is where we have our single best chance to win and then Kentucky is our second best chance to win," said the NGLTF's David Fleischer. "Michigan and Utah are well worth watching."

Albany Victory for Drug Law Reform
By NATHAN RILEY
For the first time since at least the 1970s, a member of New York State's law enforcement community has been defeated for being too tough on drug use. In Albany, District Attorney Paul A. Clyne's steadfast support of the Rockefeller era drug laws became a major liability in the September 14 Democratic primary and P. David Soares, a young former assistant district attorney, easily. The impact will likely be felt statewide.

Gay-Only Partnerships OKed
By ARTHUR S. LEONARD
A California appeals court has found that it was rational for the state Legislature to limit the benefits of domestic partnership to same-sex couples who cannot marry and elderly straight couples who would suffer reduced Social Security benefits if they married. Rjecting a fairness claim by a surviving unmarried straight partner, the court found no constitutional equality violation in the law.

Penn. Internet Censorship Law Nixed
By ARTHUR S. LEONARD
A senior U.S. district judge ruled on September 10 that Pennsylvania's attempt to block any of its residents from accessing child pornography on the Internet is unconstitutional, because it has had the incidental effect of blocking access to thousands of "innocent" Websites worldwide.

Confirmed Dead and Wounded
September 16-22, 2004
Twenty-two members of the United States Armed Forces died this past week in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Two servicemembers died n support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afganistan.


ARTS

Translation of the Absurd
By JERRY TALLMER
Having committed to learning English from a language primer at age 40, Romanian-born Eugene Ionesco copied its idiotic sentences line by line. Out of that effort, in 1950-out of that cultural/psychological/linguistic jolt-came his first play, "The Bald Soprano" and with it the birth, or to be more precise, the post-World War II, post-Dada rebirth, of Theater of the Absurd.

A Radical's Existential Dilemma
By BETSY ANDREWS
It is axiomatic to those who subscribe to the theory of hegemony, the view that there are established systems by which authority and power are maintained, that in a "free" society, the vehicle for punishment of vocal dissent is not the criminal justice system but the media. This has been a major theme of the loved and loathed leftist and linguist, Noam Chomsky.

Just Tap Away Your Worries
By CHRISTOPHER BYRNE
The type of "moon-June-spoon" musical that "Dames at Sea" gently and affectionately lampoons has not been mainstream entertainment for decades. In fact, the vast majority of contemporary theatergoers only know such musicals as "On the Town" from revivals. These shows that had at their core the premise that no crisis is so big it can't be tap-danced away.

Democracy in the Workplace
By SETH J. BOOKEY
Argentina, the second-largest nation in South America and at a former economic powerhouse, found itself in the past five years in a financial quagmire that all but destroyed the nation. How does a once-proud nation rebound? The new direct-action documentary, "The Take," looks at two phenomena happening today.

A Parable of Corporate America
By STEVE ERICKSON
"Rick," based loosely on Verdi's opera "Rigoletto," starts from the same premise that animates another movie now playing, "The Corporation"--that if the capitalist corporation were a person, it would be a psychopath. It's not the most original notion, but director Curtiss Clayton and screenwriter Daniel Handler are interested in tracking the faint traces of heart and conscience.

Globetrotting In Service to Design
By TONY PHILLIPS
Visitors to the Allentown Art Museum, in a "Museum Manners" guide, are advised: "There is no running, jumping, or shoving in the museum." It's hard to imagine the subject of its latest exhibition-Mary McFadden-didn't have to engage in all three of these unseemly behaviors to make it to the top of the fashion heap.

Dirty, But Fashionable Waters
By DAVID NOH
"I thought it would be fun to make a sex movie because I had never made one," John Waters, auteur of outrage, said about his new film, "A Dirty Shame." "I had this idea about sex being ludicrous, in a way," Waters said, "and how far can tolerance go? In the end, I don't even know that myself.

The Trip that Radicalized Che
By STEVE ERICKSON
When is a film about Che Guevara not really about Che Guevara? When it's "The Motorcycle Diaries," a buddy movie about two guys who go on a road trip through South America in the 1950s, one of whom expresses some political opinions from time to time. Imagine a South African remake of "American Pie" in which one of the horny teens is the young Nelson Mandela, and you've got the picture.

The Apple Pie Can Be Bitter
By AARON PARSLEY and SHEILA COSGROVE
Family values are not new to presidential politics or to television, but this year's Republican National Convention transformed America's first family into the latest TV reality show. George W. Bush stars as Dad-in-Chief with his devoted wife, photogenic twins, and proud parents in supporting roles. Another celebrated television event, a week later, also focused on the family, but HBO's finale of the forth season of "Six Feet Under," spoke to a different truth.

Colored Layers of Wonder
By FRANK HOLLIDAY
Peering into the LFL Gallery from 24th Street, you see 2 x 4's jutting down to the floor, holding up a precarious arching wooden structure in the way that a flying buttress supports a cathedral. Like a Giacometti standing figure renewing itself around every turn, Phoebe Washburn's installatio opens up and dazzles us, even taking us by surprise.

The Camera Never Lies
By DAVID SPIHER
In the 19th century, not long after paper-based photography began to capture a widespread audience, some of the first faked images to be foisted on the gullible public purported to show the human spirit leaving the body of a dying woman. Photographer Robert Flynt, at a transitional point in mid-career, has daringly tapped the power of those "spirit images.

Nonfiction Dreams
By BRIAN McCORMICK
Big Dance Theater implements the artistic promise of pastiche. Its works are richly layered and impressionistic--verbally and visually--and they are laced with original song, evocative dance sequences and a highly developed scene design aesthetic.

Dance Card

A Divo's Candor
By DAVID NOH
Rufus Wainwright was funny, self-deprecating, sometimes inaudible, but altogether captivating, interviewed by Stephen Holden for the "Times Talks" Gay & Lesbian Series on September 14 at FIT's Katie Murphy Auditorium. Wit his nerdy machine-gun laugh punctuating his ramblingly lucid words, Rufus enthralled the crowd of hardcore fans.

7 Days/ 7 Nights


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TRAVEL

Provincetown's Autumn Charm
By KATHLEEN WARNOCK
While summer is over and Provincetown's pace has slowed since Labor Day, there are a few thousand people who've been planning their October trip to Women's Week since the last one ended. This year, Women's Week celebrates its 20th year from October 8-17.

Where The Village Speaks French
By SEAN-MICHAEL FLEMING
My partner Kendall, our friend Jamie and I somehow imagined that a late July trip to Montreal would provide a bit of r&r from New York's summer heat. We held onto that notion even though we knew full well that we were headed there for the city's legendary annual gay pride festivities. As it turned out, there is no rest for the wicked during gay pride in Montreal, but after five days we all still were wearing smiles.

A Republican in Royal London
By ANDY HUMM
My main quarry this August in London, a city I visit often, though usually in the winter, was theater, packing in ten plays in eight days. But my oldest friend, Jim Kirby, finishing up an art history masters in mid-life
was a great companion and goad on this trip, getting me to forgo at least a few matinees to take in some of the new and older cultural offerings in the capital.


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