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Normalizing Male Vulnerability

Normalizing Male Vulnerability

BY DAVID NOH | “Saudade” is the title of the newest dance piece by 30-year-old Canadian Joshua Beamish. “It’s a Portuguese word,” the handsome dancer/ director/ choreographer told Gay City News at the Hudson Diner, “that has no direct English translated equivalent. The closest I can come to is that it’s a feeling that is […]

18th Century Joys to Cure Today’s Blues

18th Century Joys to Cure Today’s Blues

BY ELI JACOBSON | The mood of the country over the last year has been one of disaffection, discord, disunity, and disgust. The music of Mozart, Beethoven, and Handel is a balm to the ears and the soul, assuring us that there are immutable beauties of the mind and soul that historical aberrations cannot deface or […]

Antonio Ramos’ Almodóvarian Vision

Antonio Ramos’ Almodóvarian Vision

BY DAVID NOH | For those who love dance, the films of Pedro Almodóvar, and the human body, I suggest “Almodóvar Dystopia,” Antonio Ramos’ choreographic, multi-media vision, playing at Dixon Place through September 30. The bearded, ebullient Ramos described his piece as “a general view of Almodóvar’s work, and it’s more about his process. Some of […]

NYCO Plays Its Cards Right

NYCO Plays Its Cards Right

BY ELI JACOBSON | New York City Opera launched its 2017-2018 season on September 6 with a colorful, ambitious, and largely successful new production of Puccini’s “American” opera, “La Fanciulla del West” (“The Girl of the Golden West”). Consistent with the current NYCO business model, this “Fanciulla” is an international co-production with the Teatro di […]

Desert Arts

Desert Arts

BY DAVID SHENGOLD | Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Golden Cockerel” has re-emerged in the last two years at Sarasota, at New Opera NYC, and now at Santa Fe. On August 3, Emmanuel Villaume led his orchestra thrillingly through the composer’s superb, challenging orchestration. Paul Curran’s spectacular production — witty and visually inventive — made Rimsky-Korsakov’s oddly structured satirical work […]

An Assignment Secured, A Life Transformed

An Assignment Secured, A Life Transformed

BY GERALD BUSBY | In April 1976, when I was 41 years old, my life was in the tempestuous and exhilarating stages of becoming a composer. Still, I was anxiously riddled about what to do next. At the time, I was living with my boyfriend, Rafe Blasi, in a loft on Seventh Avenue and West […]

Summer of Opera Sequels

Summer of Opera Sequels

BY ELI JACOBSON | The Bard Summerscape 2017 Festival presented Antonín Dvorák’s “Dimitrij,” the plot of which functions as an operatic sequel to Modest Mussorgsky’s “Boris Godunov.” Both operas are set during the early 17th century period of Russia’s “Time of Troubles” when the pretender False Dmitri usurped the czar’s crown from Feodor II, Gudonov’s heir. […]

Magic Michael

Magic Michael

BY DAVID NOH | I’ll start with a confession, and some of you may relate: I was hesitant to interview Michael Urie. He’s so very talented, smart, funny, and handsome that I thought — in a very special and gay insecure way — “He’s got to be a bitch.” What a pleasure, then, to report that […]

Manhandeled

Manhandeled

BY DAVID SHENGOLD | Williamsburg’s National Sawdust has stolen the limelight from Le Poisson Rouge as the “go to” place for hip events in the classical industry. The space is interesting and presents all kinds of experimental work. On July 20, it hosted the fourth and last performance of a production of Handel’s “Aci, Galatea e […]

Linda Lavin’s Fine “Farewell” Returns

Linda Lavin’s Fine “Farewell” Returns

BY SCOTT STIFFLER | From cutting her teeth in the cabaret rooms of bygone Gotham to achieving sitcom icon status to her work as a commanding presence on Broadway, Linda Lavin’s career has given rise to more stories than a Midtown megatower — but she won’t be serving up that dish in beach-read form. Jazz […]