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Classic D.H. Lawrence Film Adaptation Revived

Classic D.H. Lawrence Film Adaptation Revived

BY GARY M. KRAMER |  “Women in Love,” Ken Russell’s ecstatic and erotic adaptation of D.H. Lawrence’s novel, is getting a weeklong re-release in a digitally re-mastered version at the Metrograph. The film, written for the screen and produced by ACT UP founder Larry Kramer, was a landmark romantic drama upon its release in 1969, in […]

A Finn Has the Immigrant Speak

A Finn Has the Immigrant Speak

BY STEVE ERICKSON | It’s often proclaimed today that every minority group should be the first in line to make films about themselves — and straight, white, Christian, cisgender men should be the last to make films about people other than themselves. There’s some justification for this perspective that goes beyond simply the historical entitlement […]

Anime NYC Revives a Lost Niche

Anime NYC Revives a Lost Niche

BY CHARLES BATTERSBY | New York has a major Comic Con but, in years past there was also a con just for Japanese comics and cartoons. The old New York Anime Festival was absorbed into the New York Comic Con (NYCC) five years ago, leaving the city’s nerdy Japanophiles without a major con they could […]

A Christmas Carajo at the Bronx’s BAAD!

A Christmas Carajo at the Bronx’s BAAD!

BY PAUL SCHINDLER | “Los Nutcrackers: A Christmas Carajo,” written by playwright Charles Rice- González (also acclaimed for his debut novel “Chulito”), has long been a holiday tradition at BAAD! The Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, but this December marks the third year that the award-winning director of Off-Broadway hits “La Lupe: My Life and […]

Love Stirred Slowly

Love Stirred Slowly

BY GARY M. KRAMER | In the opening scenes of “Call Me By Your Name,” gay filmmaker Luca Guadagnino’s exquisite adaptation of André Aciman’s exquisite novel, set in 1983, Oliver (Armie Hammer) arrives at Dr. Perlman’s (Michael Stuhlbarg) villa in northern Italy. A summer intern for the professor, Oliver is handsome, confident, intelligent, perhaps arrogant, and […]

Michelangelo’s Process Revealed

Michelangelo’s Process Revealed

BY DAVID NOH | Tommaso dei Cavalieri (1509-87) may not be a name as familiar as Michelangelo but he is integral to the utter fascination exerted by the truly blockbuster show “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer,” which just opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Its brilliant curator, Dr. Carmen C. Bambach, has thankfully not stinted […]

Gay Memoir of Coming of Age in Africa and America

Gay Memoir of Coming of Age in Africa and America

BY MICHAEL LUONGO | “Lives of Great Men: Living And Loving As An African Gay Man” is a new memoir by Chiké Frankie Edozien, detailing a life lived between America and Africa. Edozien grew up in Lagos, the capital of Nigeria, learning to read from newspapers his father brought home daily. He later became an ink-stained […]

Chloë Sevigny Fears Him

Chloë Sevigny Fears Him

BY DAVID NOH  | Definitely one of the Bright Young Things of Los Angeles, hilarious Drew Droege was discovered on the Internet, impersonating, of all people, Chloë Sevigny. Sharing a slightly similar equine mien with that long-lipped, terminally hip downtown muse, Droege has her glacial been-everything, done-everything blasé manner nailed. Even when nattering incomprehensibly and dropping […]

Match Play

Match Play

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Julia Cho’s complex and engrossing new play “Office Hour,” now at the Public, is a boldly theatrical examination of a harrowing, contemporary issue: random violence, or more to the point, the fear of random violence and its impact on our culture. Dennis is a creative writing student at a college where the […]

Boston, Houston, Manhattan Transfer

Boston, Houston, Manhattan Transfer

BY DAVID SHENGOLD | Lincoln Center’s annual White Light Festival kicked off with a pleasing program November 1 at the Rose Theater, focused on a reprise of the Pergolesi “Stabat Mater,” some of the most inspiriting — and certainly influential — music of the 18th century, directed and choreographed by Jessica Lang. First seen at Glimmerglass […]